The Fifth Beatle (Syndrome)

I am no music aficionado but I am sure many around the world have heard of the Fifth Beatle. Various versions of this legend exist, however, I want to use one as an analogy for the quandary that many Zimbabweans find themselves in.

The Fifth Beatle is a title used to describe the member of a group who drops out just before that group hits the big time. You know the story, wife/husband leaves spouse for greener pastures because things are tough only to find the grass is not greener and the abandoned spouse finally finds success. It’s like that other guy from Boys 2 Men or the other girl from Destiny’s Child that nobody remembers. Sound familiar now?

The just concluded elections, like any since 1980, was billed as the precursor to a new era in Zimbabwe. All candidates took on the role of messiah promising political and economic emancipation to the electorate, yet, here we are again, back to a life where the abnormal has become normal. The realisation that things are not any better than on July 30th has been cause for many, who are able, to reconsider whether they should stay in Zimbabwe or they should go on to greener pastures.

I have been one of those who has struggled with this for years and events since July 31 have been cause for much review, despite that I have long been apprehensive about the election process that brought us here anyway. That said, what do I do now?

Do I continue to stick it out and hope for the best or do I pick up sticks, sell what I can and emigrate? In the last decade I’ve had my share of feast and famine, however, I am no longer the youth I was then. Because of that I pay a lot more attention to political rhetoric and it’s impact on my decisions, economic and social.

I know now how the decisions by those in authority affect me and those immediately around me. I’m smart enough to know what my bank managers means when he or she says their interest rate is high because it includes a political risk component. I’ve heard so many acronyms for mostly failed business funding initiatives that my head spins at the thought. I understand what the Reserve Bank Governor means when he says the country is in the midst of a crippling liquidity crisis. I can see the holes in the government’s indiginisation policy and the dangers inherent in it’s implementation. I know what it means to foreign investors when the industrial index loses 10% in one day and 14% in a week and the government makes statements contrary to economic development.

Besides commitment to family and this being the country of my birth, what else keeps me here? I must acknowledge there is an element of fear of missing out on Zimbabwe’s recovery when it eventually begins. Paradoxically, the longer this recovery takes to come, the greater this fear becomes and the greater the lost opportunity becomes in one’s mind. The fear of the unknown and regret over the journeys not taken can be paralysing. Am I the only one who is going through this? I don’t think so. To those in the same situation I wish you well, your decision is your own, as for me, it’s time I risked being the Fifth Beatle.

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4 Replies to “The Fifth Beatle (Syndrome)”

  1. Reblogged this on FreedomTrapped and commented:
    This article is not about music but its substance rings true and familiar like an old musical tune from one’s youth. As post election events in Zimbabwe unfold many Zimbabweans at home are having to make long term decisions about their future: whether to stay in the country or join the millions already in the diaspora. What I’m certain about is that not many in the diaspora are considering going trekking back home to join Mugabe’s promised economic recovery party started his inauguration this morning.

    Like

  2. Hapana chekugarira. When everything that makes life modern; running water, electricity, health care, sanitation, educational facilities etc has been brought to the lowest of low by a mob of nicompoops why hang around and be another statistic whose potential remained that, potential.

    Zanu cries patriotism but patritosm does not pay bills and send my kids to school. Those in the diaspora are called unpatriotic but I call them pragmatists. Besides the zim economy over the last decade owes a lot to the millions remitted back home by the zim diaspora or else there would no economy to talk about.

    Bob and his goons are concerned about their families so why should the rest sit and watch instead of putting theirs first, be it at home or abroad.

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